Factory Girls: From Village to City in new arrival a Changing outlet sale China sale

Factory Girls: From Village to City in new arrival a Changing outlet sale China sale

Factory Girls: From Village to City in new arrival a Changing outlet sale China sale
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Product Description

An eye-opening and previously untold story, Factory Girls is the first look into the everyday lives of the migrant factory population in China.


China has 130 million migrant workers—the largest migration in human history. In Factory Girls, Leslie T. Chang, a former correspondent for the Wall Street Journal in Beijing, tells the story of these workers primarily through the lives of two young women, whom she follows over the course of three years as they attempt to rise from the assembly lines of Dongguan, an industrial city in China’s Pearl River Delta.

As she tracks their lives, Chang paints a never-before-seen picture of migrant life—a world where nearly everyone is under thirty; where you can lose your boyfriend and your friends with the loss of a mobile phone; where a few computer or English lessons can catapult you into a completely different social class. Chang takes us inside a sneaker factory so large that it has its own hospital, movie theater, and fire department; to posh karaoke bars that are fronts for prostitution; to makeshift English classes where students shave their heads in monklike devotion and sit day after day in front of machines watching English words flash by; and back to a farming village for the Chinese New Year, revealing the poverty and idleness of rural life that drive young girls to leave home in the first place. Throughout this riveting portrait, Chang also interweaves the story of her own family’s migrations, within China and to the West, providing historical and personal frames of reference for her investigation.

A book of global significance that provides new insight into China, Factory Girls demonstrates how the mass movement from rural villages to cities is remaking individual lives and transforming Chinese society, much as immigration to America’s shores remade our own country a century ago.

Review

“Engrossing. . . an exceptionally vivid and compassionate depiction of the day-to-day dramas, and the fears and aspirations, of the real people who are powering China’s economic boom.”
The New York Times Book Review

“Chang delves deeply into the world of migrant workers to find out who these people are and what their collective dislocation means for China. Chang skillfully sketches migrants as individuals with their own small victories and bitter tragedies, and she captures the surprising dynamics of this enormous but ill-understood subculture.”
The Washington Post

“Chang’s deeply affecting book tells the story of the invisible foot soldiers who made China’s stirring rise possible.”
The New York Times

“This is an irresistible book.”– People

“Excellent.”
Chicago Tribune

“Fascinating. . . Chang powerfully conveys the individual reality behind China’s 130 million migrant workers, the largest migration in human history.”
The Boston Globe

“Chang reveals a world staggering in its dimensions, unprecedented in its topsy-turvy effects on China’s conservative culture, and frenetic in its pace. . . Chang deftly weaves her own family’s story of migrations within China, and finally to the West, into her fascinating portrait. . . Factory Girls is a keen-eyed look at contemporary Chinese life composed of equal parts of new global realties, timeless stories of human striving, and intelligent storytelling at its best.”
San Francisco Chronicle

“Both entertaining and poignant. . . Chang’s fine prose and her keen sense of detail more than compensate for the occasional digression, and her book is an intimate portrait of a strange and hidden landscape.”
The New Yorker

“A compelling, atmospheric look at seldom-seen China.”
BusinessWeek

“Chang, a journalist at the Wall Street Journal, spent two years reporting in the gritty southern boomtown of Dongguan trying to put human faces on these workers, and the ones she finds are extraordinary. They are, more than anything else, the face of modern China: a country increasingly turning away from its rural roots and turbulent past and embracing a promising but uncertain future. . . The painstaking work Chang put into befriending these girls and drawing out their stories is evident, as is the genuine affection she has for them and their spirit.”
Time

“In her impressive new book, Factory Girls: From Village to City in a Changing China, former Wall Street Journal reporter Leslie T. Chang explores this boom that''s simultaneously emptying China''s villages of young people and fueling its economic growth. . . To be sure, this mass migration is a big and well-told story. But Chang brings to it a personal touch: her own forebears were migrants, and she skillfully weaves through the narrative tales of their border crossings. She also succeeds in grounding the trend in wider social context, suggesting that the aspirations of these factory girls signal a growing individualism in China''s socialist culture.”
Newsweek

“Elegant. . . Chang is less interested in exposé than in getting to know the young women of Dongguan’s assembly lines. Factory Girls reveals the workplace through the workers’ eyes.”
Financial Times

“A real coup. . . Chang, a former Beijing correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, does more than describe harsh factory conditions. She writes about the way the workers themselves see migration, bringing us views that are rarely heard. Factory Girls is highly readable and even amusing in many places, despite the seriousness of the subject. In the pages of this book, these factory girls come to life.”
Christian Science Monitor

“Amazing. . . a fascinating ethnography of the young women who labor in the factories of Guangdong, China’s richest province, a land of boomtowns where wealth and scams and exploitation and warmth and courage all abound. . . I must have read fifty books about China this year, but this stands out as one of the best.”
–Boingboing.net

“A gifted storyteller, Chang crafts a work of universal relevance.”
Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“In-depth reporting [that] contributes significantly to our knowledge about China’s development.”
Kirkus Reviews

“Rising head and shoulders above almost all other new books about China, this unflinching and yearningly compassionate portrait of the lives and loves of ordinary Chinese workers is quite unforgettable: it presents the first long, hard look we have ever taken at the people who are due to become, before very much longer, the new masters of the world.”
–Simon Winchester, author of The Man Who Loved China

“Often people ask me, ‘What’s it like for women in China today?’ From now on I''ll recommend Leslie Chang’s Factory Girls, which is brilliant, thoughtful, and insightful.  This book is also for anyone who''s ever wondered how their sneakers, Christmas ornaments, toys, designer clothes, or computers are made.  The stories of these factory girls are not only mesmerizing, tragic, and inspiring -- true examples of persistence, endurance, and loneliness -- but Chang has also woven in her own family’s history, shuttling north and south through China to examine this complicated country’s past, present, and future.”
–Lisa See, author of Snow Flower and the Secret Fan

About the Author

Leslie T. Chang lived in China for a decade as a correspondent for the Wall Street Journal. She is married to Peter Hessler, who also writes about China. She lives in Colorado.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

1 Going Out

When you met a girl from another factory, you quickly took her measure. What year are you? you asked each other, as if speaking not of human beings but of the makes of cars. How much a month? Including room and board? How much for overtime? Then you might ask what province she was from. You never asked her name.

To have a true friend inside the factory was not easy. Girls slept twelve to a room, and in the tight confines of the dorm it was better to keep your secrets. Some girls joined the factory with borrowed ID cards and never told anyone their real names. Some spoke only to those from their home provinces, but that had risks: Gossip traveled quickly from factory to village, and when you went home every auntie and granny would know how much you made and how much you saved and whether you went out with boys.

When you did make a friend, you did everything for her. If a friend quit her job and had nowhere to stay, you shared your bunk despite the risk of a ten-yuan fine, about $1.25, if you got caught. If she worked far away, you would get up early on a rare day off and ride hours on the bus, and at the other end your friend would take leave from work--this time, the fine one hundred yuan--to spend the day with you. You might stay at a factory you didn''t like, or quit one you did, because a friend asked you to. Friends wrote letters every week, although the girls who had been out longer considered that childish. They sent messages by mobile phone instead.

Friends fell out often because life was changing so fast. The easiest thing in the world was to lose touch with someone.

The best day of the month was payday. But in a way it was the worst day, too. After you had worked hard for so long, it was infuriating to see how much money had been docked for silly things: being a few minutes late one morning, or taking a half day off for feeling sick, or having to pay extra when the winter uniforms switched to summer ones. On payday, everyone crowded the post office to wire money to their families. Girls who had just come out from home were crazy about sending money back, but the ones who had been out longer laughed at them. Some girls set up savings accounts for themselves, especially if they already had boyfriends. Everyone knew which girls were the best savers and how many thousands they had saved. Everyone knew the worst savers, too, with their lip gloss and silver mobile phones and heart-shaped lockets and their many pairs of high-heeled shoes.

The girls talked constantly of leaving. Workers were required to stay six months, and even then permission to quit was not always granted. The factory held the first two months of every worker''s pay; leaving without approval meant losing that money and starting all over somewhere else. That was a fact of factory life you couldn''t know from the outside: Getting into a factory was easy. The hard part was getting out.

The only way to find a better job was to quit the one you had. Interviews took time away from work, and a new hire was expected to start right away. Leaving a job was also the best guarantee of getting a new one: The pressing need for a place to eat and sleep was incentive to find work fast. Girls often quit a factory in groups, finding courage in numbers and pledging to join a new factory together, although that usually turned out to be impossible. The easiest thing in the world was to lose touch with someone.

* * *

For a long time Lu Qingmin was alone. Her older sister worked at a factory in Shenzhen, a booming industrial city an hour away by bus. Her friends from home were scattered at factories up and down China''s coast, but Min, as her friends called her, was not in touch with them. It was a matter of pride: Because she didn''t like the place she was working, she didn''t tell anyone where she was. She simply dropped out of sight.

Her factory''s name was Carrin Electronics. The Hong Kong-owned company made alarm clocks, calculators, and electronic calendars that displayed the time of day in cities around the world. The factory had looked respectable when Min came for an interview in March 2003: tile buildings, a cement yard, a metal accordion gate that folded shut. It wasn''t until she was hired that she was allowed inside. Workers slept twelve to a room in bunks crowded near the toilets; the rooms were dirty and they smelled bad. The food in the canteen was bad, too: A meal consisted of rice, one meat or vegetable dish, and soup, and the soup was watery.

A day on the assembly line stretched from eight in the morning until midnight--thirteen hours on the job plus two breaks for meals--and workers labored every day for weeks on end. Sometimes on a Saturday afternoon they had no overtime, which was their only break. The workers made four hundred yuan a month--the equivalent of fifty dollars--and close to double that with overtime, but the pay was often late. The factory employed a thousand people, mostly women, either teenagers just out from home or married women already past thirty. You could judge the quality of the workplace by who was missing: young women in their twenties, the elite of the factory world. When Min imagined sitting on the assembly line every day for the next ten years, she was filled with dread. She was sixteen years old.

From the moment she entered the factory she wanted to leave, but she pledged to stick it out six months. It would be good to toughen herself up, and her options were limited for now. The legal working age was eighteen, though sixteen- and seventeen-year-olds could work certain jobs for shorter hours. Generally only an employer that freely broke the labor law--"the very blackest factories," Min called them--would hire someone as young as she was.

Her first week on the job, Min turned seventeen. She took a half day off and walked the streets alone, buying some sweets and eating them by herself. She had no idea what people did for fun. Before she had come to the city, she had only a vague notion of what a factory was; dimly, she imagined it as a lively social gathering. "I thought it would be fun to work on the assembly line," she said later. "I thought it would be a lot of people working together, busy, talking, and having fun. I thought it would be very free. But it was not that way at all."

Talking on the job was forbidden and carried a five-yuan fine. Bathroom breaks were limited to ten minutes and required a sign-up list. Min worked in quality control, checking the electronic gadgets as they moved past on the assembly line to make sure buttons worked and plastic pieces joined and batteries hooked up as they should. She was not a model worker. She chattered constantly and sang with the other women on the line. Sitting still made her feel trapped, like a bird in a cage, so she frequently ran to the bathroom just to look out the window at the green mountains that reminded her of home. Dongguan was a factory city set in the lush subtropics, and sometimes it seemed that Min was the only one who noticed. Because of her, the factory passed a rule that limited workers to one bathroom break every four hours; the penalty for violators was five yuan.

After six months Min went to her boss, a man in his twenties, and said she wanted to leave. He refused.

"Your performance on the assembly line is not good," said Min''s boss. "Are you blind?"

"Even if I were blind," Min countered, "I would not work under such an ungrateful person as you."

She walked off the line the next day in protest, an act that brought a hundred-yuan fine. The following day, she went to her boss and asked again to leave. His response surprised her: Stay through the lunar new year holiday, which was six months away, and she could quit with the two months'' back pay that the factory owed her. Min''s boss was gambling that she would stay. Workers flood factory towns like Dongguan after the new year, and competition for jobs then is the toughest.

After the fight, Min''s boss became nicer to her. He urged her several times to consider staying; there was even talk of a promotion to factory-floor clerk, though it would not bring an increase in pay. Min resisted. "Your factory is not worth wasting my whole youth here," she told her boss. She signed up for a computer class at a nearby commercial school. When there wasn''t an overtime shift, she skipped dinner and took a few hours of lessons in how to type on a keyboard or fill out forms by computer. Most of the factory girls believed they were so poorly educated that taking a class wouldn''t help, but Min was different. "Learning is better than not learning," she reasoned.

She phoned home and said she was thinking of quitting her job. Her parents, who farmed a small plot of land and had three younger children still in school, advised against it. "You always want to jump from this place to that place," her father said. Girls should not be so flighty. Stay in one place and save some money, he told her.

Min suspected this was not the best advice. "Don''t worry about me," she told her father. "I can take care of myself."

She had two true friends in the factory now, Liang Rong and Huang Jiao''e, who were both a year older than Min. They washed Min''s clothes for her on the nights she went to class. Laundry was a constant chore because the workers had only a few changes of clothes. In the humid dark nights after the workday ended, long lines of girls filed back and forth from the dormitory bathrooms carrying buckets of water.

Once you had friends, life in the factory could be fun. On rare evenings off, the three girls would skip dinner and go roller-skating, then return to watch a late movie at the factory. As autumn turned into winter, the cold in the unheated dorms kept the girls awake at night. Min dragged her friends into the yard to play badminton until they were warm enough to fall asleep.

The 2004 lunar new year fell in late January. Workers got only four days off, not enough time to go home and come out again. Min holed up in her dorm and phoned home four times in two days. After the holiday she went to her boss again, and this time he let her leave. Liang Rong and Huang Jiao''e cried when Min told them her news. In a city of strangers, they were the only ones who knew about her departure. They begged her to stay; they believed that conditions at other factories were no better, and that to leave or to stay would be the same in the end. Min did not think so.

She promised she would return for a visit after she got paid at her new job. Min left that same day with a few clothes in a backpack and the two months'' wages that the factory owed her. She did not take her towels and bedding with her; those things had cost money, but she couldn''t bear the sight of them anymore.

In ten months on the assembly line, Min had sent home three thousand yuan--about $360--and made two true friends.

She should have been scared. But all she knew was that she was free.

* * *

In the village where Lu Qingmin was born, almost everyone shared her family name. Ninety households lived there, planting rice, rape, and cotton on small plots of land. Min''s family farmed half an acre and ate most of what they grew.

Her future appeared set when she was still a child, and it centered on a tenet of rural life: A family must have a son. Min''s parents had four girls before finally giving birth to a boy; in those early years of the government policy limiting families to one child, enforcement was lax in much of the countryside. But five children would bring heavy financial burdens as the economy opened up in the 1980s and the cost of living rose. As the second-oldest child, Min would bear many of those burdens.

She disliked school and did poorly. As long as she could remember, she was in trouble. She climbed the neighbors'' trees to steal their plums; if she was caught she got a beating. Once when her mother ordered her to do chores, Min refused. "There are so many people at home. Why do I have to do it?" Her mother chased her for a quarter mile and hit her with a stick.

She was good at having fun. She learned how to swim and to drive a truck; she loved roller-skating and hid her injuries from her mother. "I have fallen every way there is to fall," Min said. "But you can''t think about that." She was her father''s favorite. One summer, he rented a truck and she traveled the countryside with him, selling watermelons from their farm. They drove during the day and slept in the truck at night; it became one of Min''s fondest memories. Most migrants associated the place they came from with poverty and backwardness, and some were even reluctant to say the name of their village. But long after Min came to the city, she still talked about her hometown as if it were something beautiful.

In the late 1990s, both of Min''s parents went out to work to earn money for their children''s schooling. Her father worked in a shoe factory on the coast, but poor health drove him back. Later her mother went out for a year. Min boarded at a middle school in a nearby town but returned home every weekend to cook and wash clothes for her father and the younger children.

Almost all the young people in her village had gone out. When Min was still in middle school, her older sister, Guimin, went to work in a factory in Dongguan. Soon after, Min failed the national high school entrance exam and her parents considered having her go out, too. Guimin phoned home and urged them to keep Min in school; Guimin''s factory wages, she said, would help cover the tuition. Their parents agreed, and Min enrolled in a two-year vocational high school. That made her one of the most educated people in the village--more educated than Guimin, who had sacrificed her own schooling to help the family.

Guimin came home for the 2003 lunar new year holiday and took Min away with her when she left. Min had one more semester of school, but she wanted to save the tuition and get a jump on the job hunt. She was thrilled to be leaving home; she had never ridden on a train or seen a factory. "I wanted to get out early, learn some things, and see the world," she said.

In Dongguan, Guimin rented a cheap hotel room for Min and found her a job in a Japanese factory that made liquid crystal displays. Min worked there for a month and left. She had never been in a place where she didn''t know anyone, and she was so lonely she couldn''t bear it. She returned to the hotel and found a job at another factory but didn''t take it. Her sister offered to continue paying for the hotel room, but Min felt herself becoming a burden. At a bus station, she spotted a help-wanted flyer for a quality-control job on the assembly line of an electronics factory. She dialed the number on the ad--many were just scams to trick migrants out of their money--and the person who answered the phone gave Min directions to the factory. It was a three-hour bus ride to the southeast tip of Dongguan and Carrin Electronics, the place where Min spent her hard year alone.
The minute she entered the factory grounds, Min realized the place was worse than the Japanese factory she had just left behind. But it was too late to turn back, and she did not want to ask her sister''s help again. She was getting used to being on her own--it was better that way.

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4.4 out of 54.4 out of 5
348 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

M.A. J.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The opening of a new world..
Reviewed in the United States on January 7, 2017
Excellent reading! The author clearly portrays life in modern China for young people, especially young women. Huge numbers of them move to the cities for jobs from the rural areas to earn money for their families. The jobs at the factories are miserable, mind-numbing tasks... See more
Excellent reading! The author clearly portrays life in modern China for young people, especially young women. Huge numbers of them move to the cities for jobs from the rural areas to earn money for their families. The jobs at the factories are miserable, mind-numbing tasks with monstrous supervisors,high expectations, long hours and very little safety provisions for these ''country girls''. Most factories are closed cities, the women must sleep in factory dormitories and eat factory kitchen food. They are allowed one bright shining moment on Sundays when they can go out, meet friends, buy clothing and enjoy having money in their pockets.They can even slip on a new persona, a new name and the game is to keep switching up to better and better jobs. If you have ever wondered how your ''Made in China'' products are made, this book will entertain, and educate you.Parts of it are bleak, but only in revealing the truth. The author tries to follow several ''girls''and learn their stories while also portraying huge societal change, in that a poor man''s daughter is no longer seen as a burden or liability when the family cannot provide a dowry or find a husband for her. A daughter may even achieve a status close to that of a son! The young women feel that their status is changing and they resist the old ways of getting married and having children. Some of them can say ''I want to work,'' or they may send money home but never return to their provincial villages after seeing the life in the big city. For most of her time in China the author passes as Chinese and she has the unique ability to see the issues from many different perspectives.
12 people found this helpful
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Wayne
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Like the book, the author drifted with too much about her own family
Reviewed in the United States on February 15, 2020
GOOD - The book is about factory girls - where they come from, what they experience, what their dreams are. This it covers with 5 stars. The author tells us about them and we can empathize and cheer them on. If she writes a follow-on book I will buy it. SO-SO... See more
GOOD - The book is about factory girls - where they come from, what they experience, what their dreams are. This it covers with 5 stars. The author tells us about them and we can empathize and cheer them on. If she writes a follow-on book I will buy it.

SO-SO - The author loses track a bit when she overextends about the parallels with her family history. Telling us her family was from China and what they thought of her doing this book is good but the rest tends to overdo it. She goes way back in time about her family history and somehow what happened to them long ago, during and after the Cultural Revolution is supposed to be relevant. It''s like she lost herself while writing the book.
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pullmi
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Most informative book on this subject I''ve read.
Reviewed in the United States on March 17, 2014
I have had the good fortune to meet and work with some Chinese women who are recent émigrés to the U.S. and have found them to be extraordinarily resourceful and independent. I purchased some books in order to better understand a culture that produces young people with such... See more
I have had the good fortune to meet and work with some Chinese women who are recent émigrés to the U.S. and have found them to be extraordinarily resourceful and independent. I purchased some books in order to better understand a culture that produces young people with such determination. This is not a book about historical figures or great deeds, nor is it an academic book dealing with politics or economic theory. Instead it is a third person journal which traces the lives of two particular young women who have made the decision to leave their old village life behind and travel to the city in search of employment and a new way of life. Their stories are told with compassion but unwavering objectivity. What they find and what happens to them along the way is the story of millions of young Chinese girls from rural families who make the same decision. Each one of them is different but most are driven by the shared goal of independence and a desire to better themselves and improve the lives of the family members they leave behind. They all face hardships which must be overcome in order to pursue their dream. They do this in a uniquely Chinese way: blending a strong sense of obligation to family and their traditional village values with a new faster paced urban way of life and an emerging sense of autonomy. They are pursuing an individual destiny despite being born into a stratified social order where futures are largely determined by circumstances of birth. The interplay between the two sometimes opposing and vastly different world views is what this book is really about. I found it informative, compelling and even inspiring at times This is not a book about making tennis shoes
10 people found this helpful
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Acake
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Engaging read
Reviewed in the United States on July 25, 2020
This was a well written account that tells of life for girls from villages In China who travel to the city for jobs. It was interesting to learn of the changes their lives took as the factories and the cities became more modernized. In 2019 I traveled to China as a tourist... See more
This was a well written account that tells of life for girls from villages In China who travel to the city for jobs. It was interesting to learn of the changes their lives took as the factories and the cities became more modernized. In 2019 I traveled to China as a tourist and after sitting through several demonstrations at Jade and pearl “factories” which were actually sales pitches. Looking back on those sales pitches, after reading this book, I can see many similarities between the two. Not a whole lot of differences decades later.
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David I. Cahill
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Revealing window into Chinese society
Reviewed in the United States on May 27, 2012
First things first. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but when certain ignorant Amazon customer reviewers make frivolous off-the-cuff comments like the book is "boring" or "the chapters don''t flow easily," when that is decidedly not the case, I must state right off... See more
First things first. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but when certain ignorant Amazon customer reviewers make frivolous off-the-cuff comments like the book is "boring" or "the chapters don''t flow easily," when that is decidedly not the case, I must state right off that this marvelous and well-written book is one of the best introductions to Chinese society I have read.

Late in the book there is a disturbing account of a small-scale business operation in an apartment in Dongguan, Guangdong Province. The male running it keeps his female underlings working all day and forbids to them to leave the apartment except for a few hours once a week; they sleep in a cramped dormitory-style bedroom. Quiz: this operation is A) a brothel, B) a sweatshop, C) a religious cult, D) none of the above. D is correct: it''s a private English language school for adults, mainly female factory workers between jobs who want to gain English credentials. Their teacher''s notion of language learning is, like so much in China, quantitative-based and modeled on the factory assembly line: a machine he invented rapidly rotate words which the students must memorize as they flash by. This episode in Leslie Chang''s book is representative in presenting two aspects of life in China for the hundreds of millions of migrant workers trying to achieve career stability or success in the city. On the one hand, there is the optimistic assessment, emphasized by Chang throughout the book, namely the freedom migrants now have to leave the village and go where opportunity beckons, with increasing numbers of success stories, primarily for female migrants, who often paradoxically enjoy greater freedom than males due to the obligations of male migrants to return to the village and care for their family. As Chang recounts with the stories of two migrants she befriended and followed for two years, Min and Chunming, the choices young Chinese women from the countryside now have at their disposal for upward mobility can be compared to the freedom and allure of worldwide travel young people from the developed world enjoy.

On the other hand, there is a powerful counterforce holding many Chinese back from freedom and autonomy: the imposing psychological control of group conformity. As a longtime American resident in China, I see this all the time in numerous guises among all social strata, not just migrants (and I write about this in my website attached to my Amazon profile). Although it is true that working conditions in factories have been improving over the past few years as workers learn about their rights and bargaining power through better communication (the internet) as well as negative publicity about labor exploitation at Foxconn, this still largely applies to skilled factory workers. For countless other workers in the service industry (restaurants, shop workers, the sex industry), working conditions remain awful - 12-14 hour days, 1-2 days off per month, minimum wage. Educated white-collar workers, for their part, experience a different kind of exploitation, hardly less grim: typically just as long working hours (though varying considerably from company to company) or 24-hour cellphone monitoring when off work, with elaborate penalty systems for failure to respond immediately to cellphone summons or other minor infractions (one highly educated female I know who worked as a journalist for a national newspaper quit because they were docking too much of her pay each month for largely unspecified penalties).

So returning to the aforementioned English training school, where Chang would describe the conditions experienced by these women as a matter of personal freedom and choice, we also recoil at the psychological coercion involved, which prevents them from rebelling, protesting and leaving. To be sure, this school is a bizarre exception, and most English schools in China, even unaccredited ones, are run like normal schools, with students present only during class hours. But another book needs to be written that deals with the dark side of China''s economic success, even in these upwardly mobile times. It''s good to have Chang''s upbeat account, but for every migrant who achieves success like Min, how many millions of Chinese (including the educated class) remain locked and paralyzed in their internal cages of fear and anger, quietly spending their entire waking hours making superiors rich while they receive a pittance (not to mention the horrifying ongoing problem of companies that don''t pay their workers at all, even an entire year''s promised wages, folding up operations just before the Spring Festival and disappearing). After years of teaching in Chinese universities, I could see the mental slavery all around me on university campuses, which unlike universities almost anywhere in the world, are completely void of any signs of student protests. Largely enabling and ensuring China''s economic expansion, in short, is group coercion and internalized fear on a scale few other societies know.
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Kindle Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting beyond initial thoughts
Reviewed in the United States on October 12, 2019
Factory Girls was extremely enlightening. While most read news articles about China and its government, few books portray the rural Chinese people and their daily lives, thoughts and energy invested as an immigrant leaving a rural setting. Just fascinating!
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Kindle Customer Terry
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wonderful Book
Reviewed in the United States on October 26, 2019
I was amazed on how the factory girls made such quick decisions without really understanding the consequences ,of there actions. English-speaking seemed to be the ultimate goal to become wealthy. It was interesting to get a glimpse into their fearless struggle to improve... See more
I was amazed on how the factory girls made such quick decisions without really understanding the consequences ,of there actions. English-speaking seemed to be the ultimate goal to become wealthy. It was interesting to get a glimpse into their fearless struggle to improve their lives. Would love to see a sequel to this. Most fascinating.
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Cheryl Weeks-Rosten
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Having read everything written by Peter Hessler, I turned ...
Reviewed in the United States on January 19, 2016
Having read everything written by Peter Hessler, I turned to his wife Leslie and her perspective on the young girls who came in from country villages a decade ago, to make money to send home. Of course, it changed them, and some never went back. When they did... See more
Having read everything written by Peter Hessler, I turned to his wife Leslie and her perspective on the young girls
who came in from country villages a decade ago, to make money to send home. Of course, it changed them, and
some never went back. When they did return for Chinese New Year, their financial clout in the family changed the dynamics
between parents and children. The author follows two young women over a period of a few years as they job hop, and
also tells of her search for her own roots, since her family got geographically separated during the Cultural Revolution.
Some stayed, some ended up in Taiwan and some in the U.S.
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Top reviews from other countries

helen ford
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
heartrending
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 20, 2013
this way of life is what western users of chinese goods don''t have much idea of. how chinese people are so stoic and hard working. deprivation in so may levels of their lives is hard for us soft westerners to comprehend. living in cramped, unsanitary public conditions must...See more
this way of life is what western users of chinese goods don''t have much idea of. how chinese people are so stoic and hard working. deprivation in so may levels of their lives is hard for us soft westerners to comprehend. living in cramped, unsanitary public conditions must be soul destroying. this story gives one the low down on a very very different way of life and how it is led.
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 24, 2019
As a procurement professional sourcing from China, this was an enlightening read.
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I love books!
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An insight into China
Reviewed in Canada on March 12, 2013
A look at the reality of the large migrant population in Chinese Cities from rural regions. It exposes the impact on young people of being displaced from their familes without a lifenet and the conflict they have to face between honoring a duty to the family and making...See more
A look at the reality of the large migrant population in Chinese Cities from rural regions. It exposes the impact on young people of being displaced from their familes without a lifenet and the conflict they have to face between honoring a duty to the family and making choices about their own future. Without going into much depth the book also exposes a range of social issues about the expectation of daughters, care for parents.
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Mark B.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A must read.
Reviewed in Canada on January 20, 2021
A must read to understand the lives of millions of young people in China
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Menke Maria Meijer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great read
Reviewed in Canada on April 18, 2016
Very interesting book. Having lived in China for 5 months I could relate everything she wrote about to what I have seen or learned about while there. It is written in a manner that is asy to read and kind of the type of book you carry around on the bus or train.
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